Medical Justice® aggressively addresses the interest of doctors within the changing landscape of medical practice. Our mission; to protect our members' most important assets - reputation, character and integrity - against frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits, Internet defamation and unwarranted demands for refunds.



Sep 19 2014

Billing Your Mom: Rules of Medicare

Published by under Medicare

Pop Quiz…

 

Question #1: Your mother is visiting you one weekend evening. She slips in your house. She now has a giant gash in her arm which requires stitches. Neither of you are enthused about spending the evening in an ER when you are fully competent to sew it up. Further, you will document the encounter and keep a record, as required by your Board of Medicine.

 

Side distraction. Every state has different policies vis a vis treating family members. This blog post doesn’t touch on that topic. And, in this blog post, it is reasonably assumed that your judgment will not be clouded by your emotional attachment to a family member.

 

Now that Mom is all sewn up, can you send a claim to Medicare?

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Sep 19 2014

Understanding duty and liability when you are on-call: Avoiding minefields

Published by under Healthcare Reform

We continue with our series of general educational articles penned by one attorney, an MD, JD, giving you a view of the world through a malpractice plaintiff attorney’s eyes. This attorney is a seasoned veteran.  The series includes a number of pearls on how to stay out of harm’s way. While I do not necessarily agree with 100% of the details of every article, I think the messages are salient, on target, and fully relevant.  Please give us your feedback – and let us know if you find the series helpful.

The following questions came from a hand surgeon. They address situations that might arise when he is on-call at his local community hospital. These questions encapsulate issues that may affect anyone who consults to emergency rooms.

Let’s have a look:

1. I am on-call for hand surgery. A patient comes to the ER for a hand issue that the ER either treats or stabilizes. The ER physician gives them my name for follow-up, but no appointment is made. No contact is made from the ER to me. What are my duties to the patient and my potential liabilities?

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Sep 12 2014

Notes from a Plaintiff’s Attorney: Legal issues when dating patients

Published by under Healthcare Reform

We continue with our series of general educational articles penned by one attorney, an MD, JD, giving you a view of the world through a malpractice plaintiff attorney’s eyes. This attorney is a seasoned veteran.  The series includes a number of pearls on how to stay out of harm’s way. While I do not necessarily agree with 100% of the details of every article, I think the messages are salient, on target, and fully relevant.  Please give us your feedback – and let us know if you find the series helpful.

Woody Allen notoriously maintained that “The heart wants what it wants.”

Mr. Allen thought that all that mattered when he married his daughter-in-law was his heart. But, from the standpoint of the public, the type of relationship sometimes matters as much as the bond between the two parties.

When there is a personal relationship between a doctor and a patient, society – in the form of state medical boards and the courts – will likely be in the bedroom as well.

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Sep 12 2014

Physician Report Cards: Can Chance Alone Make You Look Like a Killer

Published by under Healthcare Reform

In our data driven word, you know what’s around the corner. Report cards for doctors based on clinical outcomes. But, statistics is a funny thing. Michael Blastland, a journalist with BBC, made precisely this point with his Go Figure Chance Calculator.

 

His premise:

 

“Imagine you are a hospital doctor. Some patients die. But how many is too many before you or your hospital are labeled killers?”

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Sep 04 2014

The Lilliputian Influence of CV Surgeon Report Cards on Referrals by Cardiologists

Published by under Healthcare Reform

The holy grail for bean counters who focus on healthcare quality are tools for patients to help them find the best doctors. The argument goes: transparency will help drive quality initiatives; the data will help patients find the better doctors.

 

The process took off in 1986 when the Health Care Financing Administration released report cards of hospital-specific, risk-adjusted mortality rates for coronary artery bypass surgery. In 1991, New York picked up the baton by releasing stats for individual surgeons for risk-adjusted mortality rates for coronary artery bypass surgery. So, this data has been around for over two decades.

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Sep 04 2014

Sometimes You Settle a Case; Then You Get Sued Again. Crap.

Published by under Healthcare Reform

We learned of a case where a patient was injured at a hospital. The treating doctor and the hospital were sued. Doctor decided to settle for policy limits – $1M. He believes he got out early and can sit on the sidelines. He reasonably believes his involvement in the case is over. And the hospital may be on the hook for a larger sum.

 

The hospital sues the doctor – arguing that if a jury orders them to pay, they want the doctor’s group to underwrite some of that payment. In other words, they want to be reimbursed some of the money a jury holds them liable.

 

What happened here?

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4 responses so far

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