Medical Justice® aggressively addresses the interest of doctors within the changing landscape of medical practice. Our mission; to protect our members' most important assets - reputation, character and integrity - against frivolous medical malpractice lawsuits, Internet defamation and unwarranted demands for refunds.



Aug 29 2014

Johns Hopkins to Pay $190 Million to Settle Claims Gynecologist Secretly Videoed Patients

Published by under Healthcare Reform

Dr. Nikita Levy was a gynecologist affiliated with Johns Hopkins. He secretly photographed and videotaped women’s bodies in the examining room. When I say secretly, I mean without their knowledge or consent. Dr. Levy apparently wore a pen-like camera around his neck to accomplish the deeds.

 

In February, 2013, an employee alerted hospital authorities which forced the doctor to turn over his camera. Investigators discovered 1,200 videos and 140 images stored on servers in his home.

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5 responses so far

Aug 22 2014

Avoiding liability when you’re asked to do more than you’re trained to do

Published by under Healthcare Reform

We continue with our series of general educational articles penned by one attorney, an MD, JD, giving you a view of the world through a malpractice plaintiff attorney’s eyes. This attorney is a seasoned veteran.  The series includes a number of pearls on how to stay out of harm’s way. While I do not necessarily agree with 100% of the details of every article, I think the messages are salient, on target, and fully relevant.  Please give us your feedback – and let us know if you find the series helpful.

Dirty Harry said, “A man’s got to know his limitations.”

The best general medico-legal advice is to do nothing that is not fully within your technical and knowledge comfort zone. When you move outside your specific area of expertise you will be held to the Standard of Care of an experienced and qualified practitioner in the area you have entered.

However, real life as a practicing physician has a tendency to not cooperate with the ideal.

Recently, two physicians raised questions about how to handle moving outside that ideal zone of practice, one in an elective setting and one in an emergency setting.

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7 responses so far

Aug 08 2014

The Story of the Make a Wish Foundation

Published by under Healthcare Reform

If you’re like me, you’ve certainly heard of the Make a Wish Foundation.

 

What I did NOT know was the story of the man behind the Foundation – who he is and why he started it.

 

The man is Frank Shankwitz. He was a Arizona Highway Patrol Officer. Frank built the foundation from his heart, supporting himself and his family on his salary as an Arizona Highway Patrol Officer. He didn’t take a salary at Make-A-Wish because he wanted to ensure that every dollar contributed to the foundation went to the kids.

 

His Foundation has touched the lives of many children struggling with terminal conditions – as well as their families. The organization pays for wishes of children who are dying.

 

Someone recently asked, “Frank, after granting so many children’s wishes, what is your wish?”

 

His answer. ”I would like to have my story told in a way that I could share it with my grandkids, so they could see that through our efforts, we made the world a little bit brighter.”

 

A documentary is being filmed about Frank’s life – so his story can be told.

 

The producer of the movie works down the hall from me. I knew nothing about this project until today. It’s being funded on the crowdfunding site – Indiegogo. I just donated. If the story moves you, please jump in. Any amount will help – whether it’s $1,000 or $1. This is Frank’s wish.

 

The link describing the project can be found at: http://igg.me/at/wishman/x/3380246

4 responses so far

Aug 01 2014

Red Flag City

Published by under Healthcare Reform

A plastic surgeon called me recently. He routinely examines his female patients with a female chaperone in the room. This is a good idea. Make that – a great idea. While it’s not common to be accused of inappropriate sexual contact, the accusation does occasionally happen. Then, it’s he said, she said. Write a big check.

 

This patient said she did NOT want any such chaperone in the room as it would create “negative female energy.” Huh?

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15 responses so far

Jul 25 2014

Prescribing opioids – Navigating the minefields

Published by under Healthcare Reform

We continue with our series of general educational articles penned by one attorney, an MD, JD, giving you a view of the world through a malpractice plaintiff attorney’s eyes. This attorney is a seasoned veteran.  The series includes a number of pearls on how to stay out of harm’s way. While I do not necessarily agree with 100% of the details of every article, I think the messages are salient, on target, and fully relevant.  Please give us your feedback – and let us know if you find the series helpful.

Treating patients in pain with opioids creates serious legal quandaries for doctors.

A 2010 study (based on the American Society of Anesthesiologists Closed Claims Database) found that malpractice claims related to chronic non-cancer pain management primarily involved patients with a history of risk behaviors.

The study also found that death was the most common trigger of these claims.

Prescribing opioids causes a conflict. No doctor wants to undertreat the patient in pain. No doctor one wants the excess liability created by patients who are addicts, criminals, or a complex mishmash of unrelenting pain issues and co-morbidities.

On the other hand, that study also found that 59% of claims were grounded in physician mismanagement, either on its own or compounding a patient risk factor.

 

This means doctors still control the legal destiny of these cases. Steps can be taken to reduce the physician’s risk of being prosecuted as a “pill mill” or being held responsible for the dangerous or felonious use of the medication by the patient.

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5 responses so far

Jul 11 2014

Not on call. Just finished a large glass of wine. The ER calls. What to do?

Published by under Healthcare Reform

Most physicians wake up every day intending to do the best possible job and help their patients. They work long hours, sacrifice a normal family life, and don’t always receive a thank-you note.

 

Digest the following hypothetical.

 

You and your partner are the only neurosurgeons for a small community of 50,000 people. The draw area is larger, say 250,000. The closest major metro area is 80 miles away. And that city has a medical school, teaching hospitals, and full service trauma treatment.

 

You and your partner alternate call for both the practice and the ER.

 

Your partner is on call.

 

You’ve had a long week, and are ready to kick back. In anticipation of the weekend, you just finished a large glass of Cabernet. Yum.

 

The ER calls and you pick up the phone. You didn’t have to. But you did.

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26 responses so far

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